Cooler Master Storm Stryker

Posted by on Thursday, August 2, 2012 - 2:53pm

Cool er Master StrykerToday, we will be taking a look at another white case this week. This time it is from Cooler Master and is called the Stryker. If you look past the white color, this case may look familiar to you. If it does the case that should come to mind is the Trooper. Reproducing your best-selling cases in white is a good idea as we have seen white becoming what black was to beige. A trend that quickly spread through the masses. 

 

Introduction to the Cooler Master Storm Stryker Gaming Case

Today, we will be taking a look at another white case this week. This time it is from Cooler Master and is called the Stryker. If you look past the white color, this case may look familiar to you. If it does the case that should come to mind is the Trooper. Reproducing your best-selling cases in white is a good idea as we have seen white becoming what black was to beige. A trend that quickly spread through the masses. 

Cooler Master’s take on the Stryker

Cooler Master today unleashes the next step in warfare; the CM Storm Stryker full-tower case. Built to be an amongst the most agile full-towers, Stryker becomes the second in its class to include an ultra-strong carrying handle; allowing a gamer to travel with the finest system configurations available with relative ease. CM Storm Stryker includes features that are most coveted by gaming enthusiasts in that it has a stylish glossy black and white finish on the case and includes fans, windowed side panel, full dust filter coverage, a fan controller, an external SSD drive hot-swap dock and two uniquely designed modular hard drive cages. These features give CM Storm Stryker the ability to adapt to workstation or water-cooled gaming configurations easily.


Specifications

Model Number

SGC-5000W-KWN1

Available Color

Black and White

Materials

Appearance: Synthetic, Mesh front bezel; Case body: Steel

Dimensions (W x H x D)

250.0 x 605.6 x 578.5 mm / 9.8 x 23.8 x 22.8 inch

Net Weight

13.7 kg / 30.2 lb

Motherboard Type

Micro-ATX, ATX, XL-ATX

5.25" Drive Bays

9

3.5" Driver Bays

8 (converted from 5.25" bays by 5.25"/3.5" Combo Cages)

2.5" Drive Bays

13 (converted from 5.25" bays by 5.25"/3.5" Combo Cages)

I/O Panel

USB 3.0 x 2 (internal), USB 2.0 x 2, Audio In and Out (supports HD Audio)

Expansion Slots

9+1

Cooling System

Front: 120mm LED fan x 2, 1200 RPM, 17 dBA
Top: 200mm fan x 1, 1000 RPM, 23 dBA (converted to 120/140mm fan x 2)
Rear: 140mm fan x 1, 1200 RPM, 19 dBA (converted to 120mm fan x 1)
Bottom: 120mm fan x 2 (optional)

Power Supply Type

ATX PS2 / EPS 12V

Maximum Compatibility

VGA card length: 322.0 mm / 12.7 inch
CPU cooler height: 186.0 mm / 7.3 inch


Features

  • Stylish black and white design with mesh front panel provides constant cooling
  • Top ultra-strong carrying handle with rubber coating
  • The unique 90 degree rotatable 5.25"/3.5" Combo Cages offer flexibility for installation
  • Rich I/O support with two USB 3.0 super speed ports (int.) and 9+1 expansion slots for great expandability
  • The fan speed can be adjusted on the front panel
  • The internal tool box and Storm Guard™ bracket help gamers to secure their peripherals
  • Supports the longest graphics cards, including AMD Radeon HD 7970 and NVIDIA GTX 690

Closer look at the exterior

I think when CM came up with the idea of the Trooper/Stryker; they pretty much was saying why sacrifice anything when building a rig to take to the local LAN party. This is evident by the large and very strong handle molded into the top of the cases. And I say if you are strong enough to carry a fully loaded full tower with loads of high-end goal, why not.

The white of the Stryker make it a very good looking case. Even though they are basically the same except for color it is more eye-catching than the Trooper. Yes, we know looks are in the eye of the beholder and in this case I am the beholder.

The front of the case has a tower of mesh drive cover plate that make up most of the front. There are a total of nine of them. At the very bottom behind the CM Storm logo is a storage deck for some extra accessories. Above the bay drives is a 2.5” drive dock.

Across the top the Stryker has a lot going on. It begins with the I/O area which consists of a large power button, white reset button and the standard audio jacks. Two pairs of USB ports are present; two 2.0 and two 3.0. The user has the ability to control fans and any LED lighting via a controller mounted on top of the case.

Behind the I/O area is a rubber coated handle that the user can use to lug the case from LAN to LAN. And the underneath the handle and extending to the rear of the case is a vented area used to allow air to be exhausted out the case.

The rear of the case is slightly beyond that of a standard case. Below is a shot of the top filter extended out the rear.


There are three inlets in the rear of the case used to route cable out the rear as well as water-cooling tubing. There are a total of nine PCI expansion slots which should support most quad-GPU setups.

And off to the right is an extra expansion slot which is used to help secure your input devices like your mouse and keyboard from a victim of theft.

The bottom of the case consist of two filter covered vents and four rubber/metal feet.

The left side panel has a four-sided shape window modded into it. The clear panel is held in place using plastic rivets. The fans that you see through the vented area here are not mounted to the side panel but to the HDD cage inside.

The convex shape on the opposite side panel allows for increase area for hiding cables behind the motherboard tray.


Closer look at the interior

Removing the side panel we get a chance to look at the inside of the Stryker. I have to be very honest here I like the layout of the interior than I did of the white NZXT Switch 810, which I am a huge fan out. And it is just as clean as the white Azza Genesis 9000 we reviewed as well.

The first thing you are greeted by in the Stryker is the two large 120mm cooling fans. The fans are attached to two separate HHD cages. The fans have the same gross the rest of the case which is good. The fans and the cages can be removed and rotated to where the fans are blowing towards the video cards of the system.

The openings of the motherboard tray are large and plentiful. The CPU cut-out is extra-large and there should be no problem getting access to the back of motherboard and removing the CPU cooler. The three main outlets are all covered with a rubber grommet protecting whatever cables are ran through.

In the bottom of the case is a small HDD cage suited for 2.5” drives. The cage can be removed and the space used for whatever the builder needs like additional fans.

Here we have the rear of the case that includes another glossy white 140mm fan. The slot covers are all vented for better air circulation. And there is a tenth cover that is used for securing your input devices from theft Cm calls it Storm Guard.

Below is an image of the top mounted 200mm which doesn’t share that same gloss as the rest of the fans. I wish it was treated to the same paint job as the plastic look throws off the interior slightly. It can be replaced if you get your hands on a couple of 120/140mm fans or rad.

The back of the motherboard tray has plenty of room for extra cabling.


Build images

Conclusion

I was a big fan of the Cooler Master Trooper. It was big, has plenty of features and looked awesome. But the white of the Stryker makes it greatness of the case stand out even more. From inside out we can see all the detail that Cooler Master threw into the Stryker. And the quality is nothing short of outstanding. Everything that makes up the Stryker is high class. I haven’t been a big fan of many of the cases we have seen latest with side windows as companies take the shapes to high extremes. Not the case here as the window has classy but not simple

There are numerous features that one could point out that they really about the Stryker. The one that really stand out in my eyes the HDD cages and front fans, they are so versatile. In their standard configuration they are ideal for keeping your drives cool. Turn them around and they can add extra cooling to the video cards in the box. The list goes on and on.

Hot-swappable 2.5” HDD dock, plenty of cooling, cable management, water-cooling support, triple and quad GPU support and various tool-less options. All that makes up a great case and one worth buying. And we can’t forget after you get your beast of a rig built, you can lug it around using the metal extra strength handle. But it is going to be heavy.

One of the things we liked about the case can also go against the case. Which is the white color. White isn’t for everyone but there is a simple answer to this…..Trooper.

At $160 online is not a bad price. Yeah, it will not be consumed by the masses but those that know what they are looking for and want something that is not cheap may looking at the Stryker and give it some serious thought.

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