Cooler Master Trigger Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

Posted by on Tuesday, May 1, 2012 - 3:46pm

Cooler Master TriggerWhat makes the Trigger different from the Pro is on the surface. The trigger has that true ‘gaming’ look and macros keys. The rugged looks makes it a true Cooler Master product. But what else is there about this keyboard to make you want to buy it? Read on to find out.

Introduction to the Cooler Master Trigger Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

Today, we are taking a look at latest Cooler Master mechanical to hit the market. The keyboard is the Trigger and it is the third mechanical to be manufactured by Cooler Master. The other two would be the QuickFire Rapid and the QuickFire Pro. Both great keyboards and they both contained the MX Switches (Blue and Brown) which we love.

The Trigger also uses the beloved Brown keys just like the QuickFire Pro. Well on this part of the planet, different regions will see different switches on the shelves of the local PC stores. But I am informed that Cooler Master may offer the other three versions within the CMStore. It would be nice to give the buyer a choice of what keys he/she wants.

What makes the Trigger different from the Pro is on the surface. The trigger has that true ‘gaming’ look and macros keys. The rugged looks makes it a true Cooler Master product. But what else is there about this keyboard to make you want to buy it? Read on to find out.

Cooler Master’s take on the Trigger

Whether the weapon is chosen or that weapon chooses you, the Trigger mechanical gaming keyboard is prepared with a full featured arsenal that incorporates a selection of extremely high durability CHERRY MX Black, Blue, Brown, or Red switches*.

*The availability of CHERRY MX switch types will vary based on region.


Specifications

Model Number

SGK-6000-GKCC1 (Black Switch)
SGK-6000-GKCL1 (Blue Switch)
SGK-6000-GKCM1 (Brown Switch)
SGK-6000-GKCR1(Red Switch)

Key Switch

CHERRY Black / Blue / Brown / Red

N Key Rollover
Macro Key

6
5

Polling Rate

1000 Hz /1 ms

Backlighting

All Keys

Windows Key Disable

Yes

On Board Memory
Media Keys

64 KB
Yes

Dimensions

475(L)x162(W)x25(H) mm

 

18.7(L)x6.5(W)x0.98(H) inch

Weight

1260 g / 2.78 lbs

Features

  • High durability gold-plated Cherry switches rated for over 50 million key strokes
  • Multi-media control keys for convenient sound control
  • 5 macro keys with profile management
  • 18K gold plated ultra-low latency USB plugs
  • Anti-ghosting 6 key rollover
  • 64KB on-board memory for profile storage
  • Storm tactics key for deactivation of Windows key
  • 1000Hz driverless polling / 1ms response time
  • Two port enhanced USB 2.0 hub
  • Detachable wrist rest
  • Braided cable for durability
  • Non-slip rubber coating

Closer look

Of all the mechanical keyboards that I have come across and all the ones I have read about have all been of the same typical plain Jane design. Even the CM QuickFire models filled into this group except for a few minor appearance additions. This is where the Trigger sets itself apart from them. Because of the macros keys and the rugged lines built into the casing make it look more like a gaming keyboard.

The Trigger is had plastic body with a small plastic frame border that feels as if there is some type of rubber coating that surround it. a combination of the black and gray is used to make the keyboard stand out from the usually all black mechanical board. The overall look of the board flows very well with the HAF series of case especially the new HAF XM as well as the new Sentinel II gaming mouse.

The Trigger is slightly longer than most of the other mechanical keyboards on the market. Its overall length is a hair shorter than 19” and stands just 1” high. Weighing just 2.78 pounds makes it light enough to be transported from LAN to LAN.

The keys of the Trigger are con-caved to better comfort the user. As noted underneath the caps are brown MX switches. We have written some differences in the switches in the Rapid and Pro reviews, so check them out for more details. One thing to remember is that the brown switches are the ones that do not make much noise unless you bottom out during the pressing.

To be true to the gaming stereotype the Trigger has a series of five keys that are designated for macros. The macros assignments can task using the software made for keyboard.

And like the QuickFire Pro, the Trigger features a full numeral keypad for those that require a lot number inputting like myself.

The typical Windows key has been replaced by a CM which serves the same function but can also be disabled to eliminate accidentally pressing it during gaming sessions.

The Fn keys have two assignments, the first is their typical functions and the second would be to adjust the backlighting, media controls and volume controls.

The backside of the keyboard doesn’t have too much going on except for a couple of levers for adjusting the keyboard’s height. When lying flat the keyboard rest on six rubber feet.  And there is a large CM Storm trademark also.

The Trigger does come with a dual USB 2.0 hub. The braided USB cable used to affix the keyboard to the PC is fully detachable.

Here is a quick shot with the plastic wrist-rest attached.


Software

The Trigger is pretty unique as it has its own built-in memory in the amount of 64KB. Everything that is access and assigned within the software is stored here. So every time you go to power up the PC….and PC all your settings are uploaded and ready to use. This quickens the bridge quite a bit.

Under the Storm CFG tab you are able to assign each key of the keyboard to a particular task. After the action is assigned it can then be put under one of five different profiles.

Under Profiles you can assign each profile a name and along with that you select its ability to auto switch upon a particular application opening.

And the last screenshot is where you can assign the keyboard various macros programmed functions.


Conclusion

For the gamers out there the Cooler Master Trigger maybe the first keyboard to really play the part. It has the looks of a real gaming keyboard and the feel of what we have come to expect from a good solid mechanical keyboard. Finally, the gamers out there can have a keyboard to call their own.

The looks of the Trigger are one not everyone is going to like. Because it doesn't resemble that of the traditional mechanical keyboard. The rugged looks and the overall shape do set it apart from the masses. But eventually that plain Jane look will have to evolve to a point where it will appeal to others.

I have used the Trigger from a couple of weeks now and have enjoyed it every second I have spent on it. From general type to data entry to all out gaming, the board did not miss a step. The back light is ideal for me anyways. At night it makes it much easier to type as I am not the best by any means.

The ability to set macros and have them stored directly onto the memory of the keyboard is great from the gamer that may go from machine to machine. Now they do not have to worry about re-doing the macros each and every time. And the five profile setting allows the user to adjust the keyboard to a particular application.

At $120, this is not a bad deal at all.

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