Thermaltake Dr. Power II PSU Tester

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Posted by on Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 8:00am

Thermaltake Dr. Power III am sure many of you that frequent friends and family members PC station, the first thing you hear when the PC fails to boot is “I think the power supply is dead”. This may or may not be the case but in order to confirm this is to give the PSU a quick test to see if all the rails are working properly. Several companies have sent their version of this particular type of product to our lab. Today, we will be taking a look at the latest Dr Power II from Thermaltake. The Dr Power II has an over-sized display and able to measure idle rails voltage with pretty good accuracy

Introduction to the Thermaltake Dr. Power II PSU Tester

There are a couple things that I think should be in any PC tool box or if you don’t own a PC tool box but still call yourself a PC tech, these items will definitely make things easy on you. Items like SATA/IDE to USB adapters, extra rams of different types of ram and a old PCI video card (just because you don’t know how old of a system you will be working on next) and the item we will spend the next few minute discussing and that would be a PSU tester.

I am sure many of you that frequent friends and family members PC station, the first thing you hear when the PC fails to boot is “I think the power supply is dead”. This may or may not be the case but in order to confirm this is to give the PSU a quick test to see if all the rails are working properly. Several companies have sent their version of this particular type of product to our lab. Today, we will be taking a look at the latest Dr Power II from Thermaltake. The Dr Power II has an over-sized display and able to measure idle rails voltage with pretty good accuracy.

Thermaltake’s take on the Dr. Power II

Thermaltake Technology is eager to offer the perfect user experience and therefore design the product with excellent compatibility and flexibility for the users. The Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester particularly outstanding in this respect: supports every ATX power supply available today up to ATX12V v2.3 and also able to test every power supply output connector (SATA, PCI-Express, peripheral, Floppy and CPU connector) easily and accurately at the same time. With its manual/auto comprehensive testing flexibility, the Dr. Power II Universal Digital Power Supply Tester is a perfect addition for checking the health of your ATX power supplies.


Specifications

P/N

AC0015

Type

24pin, PCI-E, CPU, Molex, SATA

Color

Black

Dimension of main body(H x W x D)

130mm x 75mm x 24.7mm

Weight

0.14kg

Features

- Designed from the ground-up, it supports every ATX power supply available today up to ATX12V v2.3.
- Oversized LCD panel that accurately shows the value of each specific power rails (within one-tenth of a volt).
- Accurate voltage indicating for +12V/+5V/+3.3V/5VSB/-12V.
- Built-in output connectors diagnostic system, low-voltage, high-voltage, no voltage, PG alarm systems.
- Easily troubleshoots system failure due to unstable power supply.
- Built-in alarm system to identify user when the power supply demonstrates abnormal characteristic.


Closer look

The outside of the Dr. Power II is made of entirely of plastic making it not the strong component in that PC tool box but durable enough to last you quite some time. I am stating this as we have seen models that were made of aluminum or some form of steel.

The top of the unit has an extra large display screen making it easy to be read from a fair distance. We will show later that the display can become blue or red depending on the operating stage of the power supply.

On one side of the unit is a small power button that would have to be used more than once in order to get a full reading on the power. Once again we will show this in a few minutes.

At the bottom of the Dr. Power II is a-pin connection used to come the power supply being tested. The unit is fully capable with all ATX standards up to v2.3.

At the opposite end are the connections for the rest of the plugs on a power supply except the four pin floppy connection. During the testing process we were not able to connect the SATA and the MOLEX connectors at the same time due to the easy-release feature on the plugs themselves.

Here we have the rear of the Dr. Power II; there isn’t much talk about here as there is only a small label detailing the unit itself.


Quick Testing

We tested the Dr. Power II using two different power supplies. The first one was a unit that was no longer working but we wanted to see if the PSU tester would confirm this. The second PSU was fully operational.

When the Dr. Power and the PSU are all connected and powered on the first thing displayed on the lower half of the screen is whatever connectors are connected. So, if only a SATA, main ATX and PCIe plugs are connected it will be lasted at the bottom of the screen.

Pressing the power button one more time will display the main ATX connection and all its rail reading. In the images below we see the working PSU in blue with all the rails being displayed. Some power supply connections support more than one voltage rail and the Dr. Power does read each one supported. When the PSU is not working properly the display is red and gives an ‘F’ on the failed rails. When dealing with a bad power supply the Dr. Power will also sound an alarm.

Next, we see the readings for the AUX and PCIe connections.


Conclusion

We can’t state this enough a power supply tester is a good thing to have around especially if you do a lot of PC repair. And the Thermaltake Dr. Power is one of the better ones available. What makes it one of the better ones? First of all, it reads each of the rails on each connection from the PSU. Not just telling you the rail is bad using colored lights. And many PSU testers are notorious for just telling there is power to the rails whether they are low or high. The Dr. Power II will also test for stability on the different rails and alarm you of this.

The Dr. Power II shows up online for as low as $30 making it one, if not the most expensive PSU tester on the market.

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