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Cool Age Frozen Orb X120 Transform

X120TFThe X120 is based on a technology Cool Age is banking on called WIND TUNNEL. The idea behind it is to creat more surface area while keeping the cooler small. This extra surface area is created by shaping the fins of the cooler into layers of tiny loops. Air is pushed into the loops to create the wind tunnel effect. The technical talk sounds good, but I would like to say that the X120 is very impressive-looking with six heat pipes used to transfer from the base of the cooler. But are the extra heat pipes and the fancy technology enough to compete with the top dogs of the industry? We will see very soon.

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X120TF

X120TFThe X120 is based on a technology Cool Age is banking on called WIND TUNNEL. The idea behind it is to creat more surface area while keeping the cooler small. This extra surface area is created by shaping the fins of the cooler into layers of tiny loops. Air is pushed into the loops to create the wind tunnel effect. The technical talk sounds good, but I would like to say that the X120 is very impressive-looking with six heat pipes used to transfer from the base of the cooler. But are the extra heat pipes and the fancy technology enough to compete with the top dogs of the industry? We will see very soon.

 

Introduction to the Cool Age Frozen Orb X120 Transform

Two things came to mind when I looked at the name of our latest review sample. The first was, “Damn. That’s a long name,” and second, “I have never heard of Cool Age.” I plan to remedy both of these. For this review, I will just call it the X120 and I will test it thoroughly. We’re game to review anything a company is willing to throw our way, if I think our readers will want to hear about it. When Cool Age contacted me about the X120, I immediately googled it. Shortly after, I emailed them back with an enthusiastic “Hell yes. I will review it.”

The X120 is based on a technology Cool Age is banking on called WIND TUNNEL. The idea behind it is to creat more surface area while keeping the cooler small. This extra surface area is created by shaping the fins of the cooler into layers of tiny loops. Air is pushed into the loops to create the wind tunnel effect. The technical talk sounds good, but I would like to say that the X120 is very impressive-looking with six heat pipes used to transfer from the base of the cooler. But are the extra heat pipes and the fancy technology enough to compete with the top dogs of the industry? We will see very soon.

Cool Age’s thoughts on the wind tunnel technology

“Wind tunnel heat sink is a new type of heat sink developed by COOLAGE, which is characterized by hexagonal, square of round shape design contributing to remarkably extending the area of radiation versus that of the heat sink.

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In addition, it adopts a new heat sink technology that focuses on using air flowing coming through airways formed between heat sinks rapidly discharge any heat accumulated inside heat sink.

Moreover, it is expected that the airway formed between heat sinks will reduce potential frictional explosive noise caused by friction of air with straight heat sink, and thereby will help create low noise environment as well”

 

Packaging and contents

The X120 comes in a box that lacks a simple theme. After some time staring at the box, I come to the conclusion the image of the liquid shown around the window represent the gel that is found inside the heat pipes of coolers. The window I just mentioned allows the would be buyer to physically see what the wind tunnel technology is all about. The front and the back of the box lists in detail everything you will need to know about the cooler. You will get more information from this box at the Cool Age website. Though it is natively written in Korean has a poor translation over to English making the finding of information difficult.

Inside the box is everything you would need to mount the cooler to your favorite motherboard. Mounting hardware includes everything needed to mount the cooler to any current Intel motherboard (except 1156) and AMD sockets. One thing missing is a fan. Just like early Thermalright and Thermlab coolers, the decision of what fans to use is left to the end-user.

Specifications

Dimension: 126x63x150 mm
Base Material: Copper
Fin Material: Aluminum Alloy
Heat sink diameter: 6mm
Number of heat pipes: 6
Weight: 750g
Thermal Resistance: 0.10 C/W

Features

Quiet and powerful cooling due to multiple heat pipes and large aluminum in area.
Proprietary WIND TUNNEL design to minimize airflow resistance.
Support multiplatform installation tool.
Include high performance thermal compound CA-TC3

 

Closer look

For a CPU cooler the X120 has a lot going on visually. I have seen many coolers in my days and this one looks like a lot of thought went into trying to develop something that is different and yet still works well. The X120 weighs in at 750g making in a not-so heavy cooler by today’s standards.

The cooler has several aluminum fins that make up Cool Age’s Wind Tunnel design. The design is based on the concept of bending the flat fins in such a way they create small tunnels and a larger surface area. Air is forced through the tunnels and according to Cool Age making for a quiet and well worked design.

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The side of the cooler that is used to mount the fan is level and straight leaving no room to account for the hub of the fan. Most coolers are at least concaved on one side to make up the lack of air flow created by the hub of the fan. And with a cooler being convex on the opposite side makes it difficult to initate a push-pull configuration.

The X120 is supported by six heat pipes 6mm in diameter. This is more pipes than any cooler we have tested.

The copper base is coated with nickel. Though not the shiniest we have ever seen, it is about as flat as you can get.

 

Assembling and mounting

Assembling the X120 reminds me of Scythe and Thermalright. Like Scythe, the brackets are attached to the base of the cooler. Similar to ThermalRight in the way the cooler is mounted to the motherboard. The mounting brackets are attached to the base using four small screws. A plate is mated to the back of the motherboard and locking screws are used to secure the two pieces together.

Though the X120 doesn’t come with a cooler, Cool Age did supply us with a 120mm SX2 fan. The fan is attached to the cooler using two wire clamps.

Testing Hardware:

Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-EX58 UD5P
Processor: Intel Core i7 920 @ 3.8 @ 1.4v
Ram: Patriot DDR3 PC12800 6GB Tri-Channel
Video Card: Sapphire HD3870 Toxic
HDD: Seagate 7200.11
Power: Thermaltake Tough Power XT
Case: NA
Cooling: Frozen Orb X120 Transform
OS: Windows Seven RC
Thermal compound: Arctic Silver 5

Competition:

Thermalright T.R.U.E.

Testing of the Cool Age X120TF

Over time, we’ve found that we have been able to get a better overclock on our i7 920 at a very decent voltage of 1.4. We used this for the testing of the Buffalo. During testing, we allow the system to sit idle for one hour and then measure the temperature. Afterward, we then load OCCT and ran a 30 minute bench session with priority set at high and recorded the temps at the end. Each core was recorded for more detail of performance.

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Like all of our CPU cooler reviews, we like to put the sample up against the Thermalright T.R.U.E. and a Scythe cooling fan. In this case, we decided to retest the T.R.U.E. with the Scythe fan and the SX2. As well, we tested the X120TF with both fans. This was only fair as the Thermalright cooler performed better with a low to med CFM fan and because the X120F comes with high speed fan it is obvious the density of the cooler would cause an issue with a slower fan.

 

Results

For the most part, I was correct about the fan needs of each cooler. We saw the T.R.U.E. handle its business withe each of the fans. As far as the X120TF, it’s okay with the Scythe fan but better with the SX2. The X120TF got the best of the Thermalright with a slower speeding fan with a faster and louder fan.

Conclusion

The Cool Age X120TF is a pretty decent cooler depending on the fan that you intend to use on it. With a faster fan like the SX2, you will see the cooler perform alongside the best of them, including the Thermalright T.R.U.E. At full speed the Cool Age cooler tops the numbers we saw from the slower speed fan attached to the T.R.U.E.. We knew going into the review the X120TF would need a fast fan due to the density of the fins. If you decide to go the way of the Cool Age, you will be glad to get the fan controller as the SX2 is a burner. At 2000 RPM and 32dB it can be heard and heard from a good distance away. When the SX2 was tested on the T.R.U.E, we noticed the fan was much louder making the statement from Cool Age that the way the X120TF was designed reduces the noise level of the fans used.

With this being the first cooler based on this new design, I foresee the peformance numbers getting better as time goes by and Cool Age improving on the design. Honestly, I can’t wait for further coolers from this company and it is only a matter of time, before we are talking about Cool Age the same way we talk about Thermaltake, Zalman and others mentioned when talking about high performance coolers.

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ProClockers was founded in 2004, and since then we have reviewed thousands of tech products, including motherboards, CPUs, graphics cards, PC cases, cooling solutions and more. Whilst many of the original products we reviewed back then have long bit the dust, we continue working hard to provide unbiased PC hardware and tech reviews.

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