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Crucial 256GB v4

The next option may be the best. You can run out and pick up a brand spanking new Crucial v4 solid state drive. The v4 series is new to Crucial’s SSD line-up and is built around a SATA II controller. Yes, that is right the v4 is a SATA II model and comes in the more popular sizes of 32GB, 64GB, 128GB and 256GB units. And another attractive thing is the price.

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The next option may be the best. You can run out and pick up a brand spanking new Crucial v4 solid state drive. The v4 series is new to Crucial’s SSD line-up and is built around a SATA II controller. Yes, that is right the v4 is a SATA II model and comes in the more popular sizes of 32GB, 64GB, 128GB and 256GB units. And another attractive thing is the price.

Introduction to the Crucial 256GB v4 SATA II Solid State Drive

If you have a system even a new system that is working just fine but looking to up the performance chances are the best item to upgrade is the hard drive. Many of you may have chosen the mechanical drive in your build configurator in order to save a few dollars. But now solid state drives are reasonable priced to where they are affordable.

So, the thing to do is find the most reliable, largest capacity and fastest drive you can afford. A good bet would be a nice 120GB/128GB SSD with either a Marvell or SandForce controller utilizing the SATA III protocol. You really can’t go work using this route.

But what if you don’t have a box or laptop that has SATA III ports? Well then, you can opt to just use a SATA model and eat the extra cost. Or you can elect to purchase an old model but then you may have to sacrifice some warranty time.

The next option may be the best. You can run out and pick up a brand spanking new Crucial v4 solid state drive. The v4 series is new to Crucial’s SSD line-up and is built around a SATA II controller. Yes, that is right the v4 is a SATA II model and comes in the more popular sizes of 32GB, 64GB, 128GB and 256GB units. And another attractive thing is the price.

Crucials take on the v4

The right drive.
If you bought a computer before 2011 and you’re looking to upgrade to an SSD, the Crucial® v4 SSD might be just what you’re looking for. Designed to deliver substantial performance for mainstream computers, the Crucial v4 SSD was created to complement the abilities of your system. Since most computers made before 2011 have slower data transfer capabilities than newer systems, they’re best-suited for the Crucial v4 SSD, which was built with these transfer speeds in mind. The Crucial v4 SSD was designed for mainstream consumers and delivers a powerful SSD experience that’s been right-sized for your system’s capabilities.

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The right performance.
The Crucial v4 SSD delivers everything you’ve come to expect from the award-winning line of Crucial SSDs: faster read/write speeds, faster boot times, faster application loading times, and increased reliability compared to traditional hard drives. The Crucial team has taken all of their SSD expertise and fine-tuned it to deliver powerful performance for mainstream computers at an affordable price.

The right price.
Why pay for performance you can’t use? Designed to complement mainstream systems, the Crucial v4 SSD saves system owners money while maintaining a high level of SSD performance. Since the Crucial v4 SSD doesn’t include pricey features that cater to advanced-bandwidth systems, Crucial is able to offer a high-quality product at an affordable price.

Specifications

Model Number

CT032V4SSD2

CT064V4SSD2

CT128V4SSD2

CT256V4SSD2

Capacity

32GB

64GB

128GB

256GB

Interface

SATA 3.0 GB/s

SATA 3.0 GB/s

SATA 3.0 GB/s

SATA 3.0 GB/s

Sustained Sequential Read * up to (128k transfer)

200 MB/s

230 MB/s

230 MB/s

230 MB/s

Sustained Sequential Write * up to (128k transfer)

60 MB/s

100 MB/s

175 MB/s

190 MB/s

Random Read up to ** (4k transfer)

10,000 IOPS

10,000 IOPS

10,000 IOPS

10,000 IOPS

Random Write up to ** (4k transfer)

1,200 IOPS

2,400 IOPS

4,000 IOPS

4,000 IOPS

Form Factor

2.5 inch 9.5mm

2.5 inch 9.5mm

2.5 inch 9.5mm

2.5 inch 9.5mm

Closer look

If you are in the market for a solid state drive and can take advantage of the SATA III models then move along to one of other many SSD reviews. This review is for those that are using computers that have no SATA ports but the older SATA II plug-ins.

The new v4 comes in 32GB, 64GB, 128GB and 256GB sizes and aimed strictly at those with slightly older computers or MACs and those looking to save a few dollars on their SSD purchase. Prices according to Crucial’s site for the m4 are $83, $112 and $223 for 64GB, 128GB and 256GB sizes. The v4 are priced at $70, $100 and $190 for the same sizes.  This is a saving of approximately 16%, 11% and 15% across the board.

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The Crucial v4 falls under the typical SSD category of being 2.5 inches and being 7mm thick making a direct replacement for many laptops including Ultrabooks.

The shell of the drives is all black different from the gray cover of the m4. On the top is a sticker label that is the inverse of the m4 and is gray, blue and white.

The drive we are looking at today is the 256GB model and like the three other units is based on a Phison PS3105 controller and Micron 25nm synchronous MLC NAND. The result of the combination is sequential reads of 230MB/s and sequential read of 175MB/s and a IOPS of 10k/4k read/write.

Test Hardware:
1. ASUS X79 Deluxe Motherboard
2. Intel Core i7 3930K Processor
3.Kingston HyperX 1866 DDR3 16GB
4.Crucial v4 256GB
5.ASUS BC12B1LT BD-Rom Drive
6. Thermaltake Frio Extreme CPU Cooler
7. MicrocoolBanchetto 101 Open Air Test Bench
8. Silverstone Strider Gold Evolution 850W Power Supply
9. ASUS Nvidia GTX 560Ti 448 Graphic Card

Results

HD Tune Pro 3.50
HD Tune Pro is an extended version of HD Tune which includes many new features such as: write benchmark, secure erasing, AAM setting, folder usage view, disk monitor, command line parameters and file benchmark.

CrystalDiskMark 3.0
CrystalDiskMark is designed to quickly test the performance of your hard drives. Currently, the program allows to measure sequential and random read/write speeds.

AS SSD
The synthetic tests to determine the sequential and random read and write performance of the SSD. These tests are carried out without using the operating system caches. In Seq-test measures the program how long it takes to read a full 1 GB of file to write respectively. In the 4K test the read and write performance for random 4K blocks is determined. The 4K-64-THRD-test corresponds to the 4K procedure except that here distributes the read and write operations on 64 threads. This test should be SSDs with Native Command Queuing (NCQ) differences between the IDE operation mode where NCQ is not supported, and represent the AHCI mode. The additional compression test can measure the performance of the SSD as a function of compressibility of the data. This is especially the controllers that are used to increase the performance and life of the cell compression is important.

Anvil’s Storage Utilities
The Standard Storage Benchmark performs a series of tests, you can run the full test or just the read or the write test or you can run a single test like i.e. 4K QD16.

Conclusion

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The v4 from Crucial is somewhat of a throwback of solid state drives before 2011 and was based on the SATA II controller. The numbers presented by the drive are typical of those used to take advantage the SATA II controller. At 230/175 MB/s read and writes, you will see vast improvements in every area of computing over a mechanical drive and a cut in boot-up time to about half. The v4 is new to the Crucial product line so reliability is still up in the air but if it is anything like the m4 there are no worries.

The one thing here is the pricing of the drives. Yes, it is cheaper than the m4 but only about 11-15 percent on average according to the prices on Crucial’s own website. In the open market we can see the percent decrease as well as increase depending on the storefront.

When using the v4 in a machine with only a SATA II the savings can be placed in another area like ram. If the drive is only going to be used for a short period of time because you are planning on upgrade the complete laptop or moving to a newer motherboard than the case could be made to look to a drive like the m4 versus the v4.

 For me personally, my aging Sony laptop has been fine for what I use a laptop for so a jump to a drive like the v4 is worth it. I foresee the v4 being on sale for some incredible prices just like we have seen with the m4. And when so, the prices should be incredible.

So, if you are sitting on an older machine sporting a mechanical drive, the v4 is a most have. 

 

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ProClockers was founded in 2004, and since then we have reviewed thousands of tech products, including motherboards, CPUs, graphics cards, PC cases, cooling solutions and more. Whilst many of the original products we reviewed back then have long bit the dust, we continue working hard to provide unbiased PC hardware and tech reviews.

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