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Razer Orochi Black Chrome Elite Bluetooth Gaming Mouse

Razer has been a leader in gaming peripherals since 1998 and begun right here in sunny San Diego. No conversation about mice and keyboards can go without the word Razer being thrown in several times. Mice like the Naga, DeathAdder and Mamba are or will be classics. So, if you were in the market for a smaller more mobile gaming mouse who would you call on? Razer.  And that mouse would be the Orochi. Small in size but big in performance. According to Razer anyways, so we will find out for ourselves.

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Razer has been a leader in gaming peripherals since 1998 and begun right here in sunny San Diego. No conversation about mice and keyboards can go without the word Razer being thrown in several times. Mice like the Naga, DeathAdder and Mamba are or will be classics. So, if you were in the market for a smaller more mobile gaming mouse who would you call on? Razer.  And that mouse would be the Orochi. Small in size but big in performance. According to Razer anyways, so we will find out for ourselves.

Introduction to the Razer Orochi Black Chrome Elite Bluetooth Gaming Mouse

Razer has been a leader in gaming peripherals since 1998 and begun right here in sunny San Diego. No conversation about mice and keyboards can go without the word Razer being thrown in several times. Mice like the Naga, DeathAdder and Mamba are or will be classics. So, if you were in the market for a smaller more mobile gaming mouse who would you call on? Razer.  And that mouse would be the Orochi. Small in size but big in performance. According to Razer anyways, so we will find out for ourselves.

Razer’s take on the Orochi

The all-new Razer Orochi Black Chrome Edition is the latest update to Razer’s highly successful, diminutive yet immensely powerful mobile gaming mouse. The striking, glossy finish accentuates its ergonomic design making this the most desirable weapon for gaming on-the-go.

Packed with cutting-edge technology like a gaming-grade laser sensor and dual-mode Bluetooth wireless and 1ms lag-free wired functionality, the Razer Orochi delivers competitive gaming performance in a small, portable and easy-to-use package.

Specifications

  • Razer Precision 3G Laser sensor
  • Tracking up to 100 inches per second
  • Ambidextrous design
  • Razer Synapse On-board Memory
  • On-The-Fly Sensitivity adjustment
  • Zero-acoustic Ultraslick mouse feet
  • Gold-plated USB connector
  • Powered by 2 AA batteries
  • Approximate Size : 99 mm / 3.90” (Length) x 67 mm / 2.64” (Width) x 35 mm / 1.38” (Height)
  • Approximate Weight: 68 g / 0.15 lbs

Wireless Mode

  • Gaming optimized Bluetooth® 2.0 connectivity
  • Up to 2000DPI sensitivity
  • 125Hz polling/ 8ms response
  • Powered by 2 AA batteries
  • High performance batteries are recommended for longer battery life
  • To conserve power, switch off the Razer Orochi when not in use

Wired Mode

  • Detachable three foot, lightweight, braided micro-USB cord
  • Up to 4000DPI sensitivity
  • 1000Hz Ultrapolling/ 1ms response
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Closer look

It is not uncommon to see people gaming on laptops these days. With the way mobile technology has progress over the past years people are resorting to laptops for gaming as they do take up less room, they have the graphic cards to allow games to run as quick and flawless and we can’t forget all the companies now making mobile gaming peripherals to aid in the gaming experience.

I for one picked up a laptop that I would not consider it a gaming laptop as they are priced out of my range. But the one I did manage to get when looking did have a NVidia 310M that does allow me to do a fair share of gaming in my spare time which is far and apart as I spend most of my time reviewing. I currently use a Logitech G9 which is a great mouse but I am restricted in ways because of the USB attachment. And plus the cable is starting to develop shorts in the end due to me moving around constantly.

And with that being said it is time to loosen the chains and look in a different route. Our friends at Razer have sent over the Orochi Black Chrome Bluetooth gaming mouse. This should in theory solve my mobile gaming issues. The Orochi Black Chrome and the two other member of the Orochi family are targeted at the gamers that choose to gaming on a mobile PC. The other two models are the regular and Blade.

The Orochi has one advantage over a lot of other mobile mice on the market and that is it can run wireless or wired. So you do get the best of both worlds. The specs are different depending on how you decide the PC will interact with the mouse. In wireless model it has a DPI of 2000 while wired it jumps to 4000 DPI sensitivity.

For the mouse to work in a wireless environment the machine being used must have Bluetooth 2.0 abilities. There is no BT adapter that comes with the mouse. And running in this capacity means you will also need batteries. The Orochi uses two AA batteries. Razer does not give any operating time when using batteries but we would have to assume a couple months at least. The mouse does not recharge chargeable batteries so you would need to keep a fresh set around just in case.

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To begin, we often think about things being small when talking about mobile devices. And that is the case with the Orochi but only to a point. It is slightly longer than some other portable mice on the market. It measures just less than 4” long. Anything smaller I think I would have to take a pass as I have some long fingers.

The looks of the Orochi is pretty impressive and almost space-age like. A look that reminds me of a future concept car model. The shape is very aerodynamic and slopes from the front going backwards. In the title it mentions chrome so with that you should understand that there will be a shine to the mouse. And there is. And with that you should realize that finger prints will happens. And it will. Check out the logo in the rear end of the mouse.

The Orochi has a total of seven buttons (two sets of side buttons) which are all standard ones: left, right scroll, back and forward. Holding the mouse the way I do feels much like that of a claw-style mouse which the Orochi is not. How I came to that conclusion is claw-style mice tend to be shorter in some cases and never really reaching the end of your palm near your wrist. The same holds true for the Orochi just on a smaller scale.

In order to access the battery compartment you simply have to slide back the top shell of the mouse. I was worried that the Orochi would be too light in weight for my liking. But I was wrong as the two batteries add just enough to comfort me.

Turning the mouse over you we that it slides across the pad using four Teflon feet which Razer labels Zero-acoustic Ultraslick. In the middle of the mouse is a Precision 3G laser. An off/on switch is provided to prolong the life of the batteries.

If you decide to use the mouse wired there is a 3’ sleeved cable with a gold USB connector. When attached the mouse automatically jumps to wired mode. When not used the cable is completely detachable from the mouse and can be stored in the included pouch.

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Conclusion

The new Razer Orochi Black Chrome mobile gaming mouse could be just what the doctor prescribed if you looking for something small, faster and awesome looking. This little beast packs as much tech as many of the larger mice on the market. The 2000 DPI in wireless mode did pretty well for everyday activities and when it came down to gaming we had no issues whatsoever. I know many will start screaming lag, lag, lag, honestly we didn’t see it. The only lag we show during the time with the Orochi was during the pairing procedure for the first time.

Most peoples’ gripe with the Orochi will be its size. I had the same gripe…at first. Then I thought about how Razer was looking to make a high performance miniature gaming mouse and not a full-size gaming mouse. The size does take some getting used to. I am stilling trying to work on the overall comfort level. People with large hands or long fingers will go through a period of adjustment.

To work with your system in the wireless mode it has to have the Bluetooth option or some form of BT adapter. The Orochi does not come with its own adapter. If you are table to really game on your laptop chances are you paid a pretty penny for it. And when this is the case the system will have BT. If it doesn’t I would be looking to get a refund and looking for another system. The mouse did seem to take its time pairing for the first time which I didn’t really consider a real problem. After that first time no issues from that point on.

We all like shiny things and the Orochi does fit that description. And with it being as shiny as it is calling it a finger print magnet is an understatement.

The Orochi in the black chrome form will cost anywhere from $70 to $90 depending on where you buy it. At this price it cost more than most full-size mice. And only the buyer or better yet potential buyer will have to discuss for themselves if it is worth it.

 

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ProClockers was founded in 2004, and since then we have reviewed thousands of tech products, including motherboards, CPUs, graphics cards, PC cases, cooling solutions and more. Whilst many of the original products we reviewed back then have long bit the dust, we continue working hard to provide unbiased PC hardware and tech reviews.

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