Thermaltake V9 Mid Tower

v9Thermaltake recently had incredible success with their version of this type of case which is called the M9. The M9 was a very good looking case and was a favorite here at Pro-Clockers. But just recently Thermaltake released a press release announcing their new case called the V9. Both cases have their similarities as well as their differences. One difference is the windowed side panel and a very large top mounted fan on the newer V9.

Introduction

It seems that everything relating to computer components go through stages where things look silimar to another. Take coolers for an example. Each of the last ten or so coolers we have tested have all looked identical to one another. The Thermalright Ultra-120, Sunbeamtech Core Contact and others have shared many physical silimarities. Don’t get me wrong they each have features that make them all different but overall they do look alike.

Well its the same thing happening when it comes to cases. With the introduction of the Antec Nine Hundred, Thermaltake M9 and the Coolermaster 690 there have been a vast number of cases being produced with a complete mesh front with alot of 5.25 bays. This style of case has been a big hit as they allow for alot of drives to be used and the ventrilation they offer is incredible. And the overall look had gamer written all over them.

Thermaltake recently had incredible success with their version of this type of case which is called the M9. The M9 was a very good looking case and was a favorite here at Pro-Clockers. But just recently Thermaltake released a press release announcing their new case called the V9. Both cases have their similarities as well as their differences. One difference is the windowed side panel and a very large top mounted fan on the newer V9.


Specifications

Case Type    Mid Tower
Material    0.8 mm SECC
Front Bezel Material   

Plastic

Color    Black
Side Panel    Transparent Window
Motherboard Support    12″ x 9.6″ (ATX)
9.6″ x 9.6″ (Micro ATX)
Motherboard Tray    N/A
5.25″ Drive Bay    4
Ext. 3.5″ Drive Bay    2
Int. 3.5″ Drive Bay    5
Expansion Slots    7
Front I/O Ports    USB 2.0 x 2
HD Audio
Cooling System   

– Front (intake) :
120 x 120 x 25 mm blue LED fan, 1300rpm, 17dBA
– Front (optional) :
140 x 140 x 25 mm
– Rear (exhaust) :
120 x 120 x 25 mm TurboFan, 1300rpm, 17dBA
– Top (exhaust) :
230 x 230 x 20 mm Silent fan, 800rpm, 15dBA

Liquid Cooling Capable    Yes
Liquid Cooling Embedded   

No

Power Supply Supported    Standard ATX PSII
Power Supply Included    No
Dimension (H*W*D)    18.19 x 8.19 x 19.10 in
462.0 x 208.0 x 485.0 mm
Net Weight   
13.87 lb
6.29 kg
Security Lock     
Application     
Warranty    3 Years

Features

Top 23cm silent fan Built-in
Metal grilled front panel
Bottom-placed PSU design for better and easier installation
MB tray fan hole pre-drilled for better MB ventilation
Tool-free installation for 5.25”, 3.5” and PCI devices


Closer look outside

The V9 does have a nice mesh front that we have been seeing in a lot of cases lately. I have been a fan of them since the Coolermaster CM690 which we reviewed some time back. The first of the V9 series to be released comes only in black with a X shaped windowed side panel. One thng that I am not a fan of are doors on cases and the V9 does not have one. And due to the case being labeled as a gamer enclsoure you know the front facil has to have a stylist deign. The front consists of four visable 5.25 bays and two 3.5 bay and looks pretty fluid. At the bottom of the case we have evidence of a single fan at the front bottom of the front. In this case it is a 120mm red LED unit.

The top is where alot of the excitement is. First up front is the I/O area which consists of two USB and two audio ports. Clearly it lacks the eSATA and firewire port which would add a great deal of storage options to a system. Thermaltake did a good job of putting the port near the front to make them easier to get to. Just behind the port is a very large 230mm cooling fan. This larger than life fan only spins at 800rpm and noise is not a problem as it is rated at 15dBA.

The left side panel is the only side with a window on it. The window is only partial as one slant of the X is a window and the other leg is large holed mesh. The opposite side of the case has no windows but it does have vent areas to help air circulation.

The rear isnt really exciting at all. Here is the first sign of a bottom mount power supply configuration. At the top are two inlets for watercooling tubing. The inlets are rather small to only accomodate 3/8 tuding which is what most of the Thermaltake water-cooling kits consist of.


Closer look inside

When empty the V9 looks to have alot of room available but we all know that changes as we start to throw things in the build. The entire inside is made from thick SECC metal which is much heavier than aluminum but tends to be sturdier.

When it comes to storage options there are four 5.25″ and seven 3.5″ bays to utilize for whatever you would need them for. All drives are held in place using these toolless brackets. Caution must be taken when turning the knobs to lock them in place as I made the mistake of forcing the issue and making the metal hooks in the brackets pop out. Good thing they easily went back in place.

At the bottom of the case is where the PSU would be mounted is a small ventilation opening. Its good to see companies like Thermaltake paying attention to detail when it comes to this area. In this case exhaust from the PSU can easily exit for a cooler interior.

The back has two real features that makes the V9 stand out some. The first is the attractive 120mm cooling fan and the other is the toolless quick locking PCI brackets.Just a turn and lift gives you all the security you will need.

The motherboard tray is not at all removable but one nice thing is the tray has built-in stand-offs which means you may not need the standard metal ones that come with all cases. As part of the tray is a vent area that a 70mm fan can be attached to for extra cooling.


Assembling

Installing your well earned components in the V9 is about as straight forward as opening our front door. We started with the mounting of the motherboard. In this case we installed the motherboard with the cooler attached just to show you have much room is in the case for bigger coolers. Our Ultra-120 just cleared the side panel. Next, was the mounting of the HDD which is installed with the connectors to the back for a clean look when you go to wire the system. Mounting the PSU was simple as well but hiding cabling will be challenging as there are no real routing options.


Conclusion

The V9 from Thermaltake is a real reminder of the current trend of cases. The mesh-look is classy and really says ‘Gaming’ chassis. The exterior look is clean and well thought out. The I/O area at the top is well placed for easy access. But what alot of individuals will like is the interior of the V9. The top mount 230mm fan in combination with the other two 120mm fans make for good air ventrilation. The need for no tools makes for a quicker and painless install. All said and done the V9 is great for a moderate gaming system.

The V9 is not without its faults. One would be the lack of space for cable routing when it comes to neatly tucking the power supply cables away. So, I would suggest a modular PSU in this case.. If you are one that likes to piece together your water-cooling kits and leave it all internal then you will lack space for some kits.

We would like to think Ramsom and TT for sending over the V9 to us.

Pros
230mm cooling fan on top
Good ventrilation
Mesh front
Bottom power supply mounting
Toolless
Fits larger coolers

Cons:
Top of case is plastic
Cable management issues



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