CPUs

Search form

ProClockers has a veteran review team that has many years of hands-on experience with different types of CPUs and next generation APU processors. Our team strives to give the most objective and unbiased CPU reviews and processor reviews to give our readers the knowledge they need to make the right purchase on their next build. We currently only have AMD processor reviews, but are also open to doing Intel processor reviews for those companies interested.

Posted by Damon Bailey
on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 8:00am
Intel Core i7-7820X CPU

Nearly six years ago in November of 2011, Intel divided its lineup by releasing its first HEDT (High-End Desk-Top) in the form of the X79 platform and a trio of Sandy Bridge-E CPU’s with the flagship 6-core Extreme Edition Core i7-3960X. The platform eventually received an update to Ivy Bridge-E with three new CPUs. Three years later, the updated X99 platform was launched with another trio of Haswell-E CPU’s with the 8 core i7-5960X, later to be trumped with Broadwell-E’s 10-core i7-6950X. Fast-forward just under 3 years and Intel brings us X299. This time however, Intel changed the game and announced NINE different CPU’s over a stagger launch. Spanning 2 architectures at the same time, Skylake-X and Kaby Lake-X, X299 hits the ground with a starting lineup from quad core to 18 cores, up to quad channel ddr4 memory and up to a hefty 44 PCIe lanes.
 

While we wait for the remaining Sky Lake-X CPU’s to arrive, we’ll take a look at one offering near the middle of the shotgun pattern launch with the 8 core, 16 thread Intel Core i7-7820X. Does it compare to the retiring 8 core champion of X99? We certainly aim to find out!

Posted by Heath Coop
on Friday, June 23, 2017 - 8:00am

The new X299 platform brings a number of new features and enhancements over the previous X99 platform. It also brings with it a new line of processors. They range from 4 cores all the way up to 18 cores. Skylake-X handles the 6 core to 18 core variants, while Kaby Lake-X handles the 4 core models. We recently reviewed the top dog Skylake Core i9 7900X. Today we will be looking its little brother, the Kaby Lake Core i7 7740X.

Posted by Heath Coop
on Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 8:00am

At Computex this year Intel announced its new high-end desktop (HEDT) platform. All the architecture changes meant that Intel needed a new socket, Socket 2066. The new X299 platform brings a number of new features and enhancements over the previous X99 platform. It also brings with it a new line of processors. They range from 4 cores all the way up to 18 cores. Skylake-X handles the 6 core to 18 core variants, while Kaby Lake-X handles the 4 core models.

Posted by Heath Coop
on Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 7:30am

A couple of days ago we reviewed the Ryzen 7 1700X, a member of AMD’s much anticipated replacement for the aging FX series processors. We came away quite impressed. It offered performance rivaled many more expensive processors from Team Blue. Today we get to look at least expensive processor in the Ryzen 7 lineup, the Ryzen 7 1700.

Posted by Heath Coop
on Monday, April 3, 2017 - 8:00am

AMD fans are dancing in the streets. Why? AMD’s much anticipated Ryzen processor is finally here. Ryzen is the replacement for the long maligned FX series processors. Ryzen features an all new design that promised far great performance and far greater efficiency.

Posted by Heath Coop
on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 - 8:00am
Intel Core i3-7350K Kaby Lake

Upon release, we reviewed the flagship of the Kaby Lake lineup, the Core i7-7700K. We came away rather impressed. Not only did it outperform the previous generation Core i7-6700K, it also proved to be a more capable overclocker. This time we have the Core i3-7350K. The Core i3 has half the hyperthreaded cores of a Core i7 and half the L3 cache at 4 MB. However Turbo Boost is disabled. Like its bigger brother, it features an unlocked multiplier though, for easy overclocking. This is something we haven’t seen since the 1st generation Core processors.

Posted by Heath Coop
on Saturday, January 7, 2017 - 8:00am
Intel Core i7 7700K Kaby Lake

On August 30, 2016 Intel announced its next generation processor, Kaby Lake. They also announced that Kaby Lake would continue to use their 14 nanometer process that had been used with the two previous generations, Skylake and Broadwell. It had been highly anticipated the 10 nanometer Cannonlake would be the successor to Skylake, so it raised a few eyebrows and even more questions, as this broke with Intel long standing “tick-toc” manufacturing and design model. Instead Kaby Lake would represent a further optimization on Skylake’s architecture. Indeed, Intel has replaced the “tick-tock” with a "process-architecture-optimization" model.

Pages

Linode VPS Hosting