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Scythe Yasya CPU Cooler

Well that is until our next review sample was released. Scythe route back to the top of the cooling throne begins with the newly released Yasya. The Yasya is the first in line to use Scythe’s new T.M.L.F or Trident Multi Layer Fin technology. This new technology simple put is placing the fins in an unparalleled arrangement to reduce the static pressure allowing for better heat transfer. Does it work? Read on and find out.

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scythe yasya

Well that is until our next review sample was released. Scythe route back to the top of the cooling throne begins with the newly released Yasya. The Yasya is the first in line to use Scythe’s new T.M.L.F or Trident Multi Layer Fin technology. This new technology simple put is placing the fins in an unparalleled arrangement to reduce the static pressure allowing for better heat transfer. Does it work? Read on and find out.

Introduction to the Scythe Yasya

Scythe is one of those companies that is known to put out some really good products especially CPU processors. Coolers like the Ninja and the Mugen were both top tier coolers during their time. The time i am speak of would be the socket 775 era. As new processors came out Scythe upgraded the bracket mechanisms to support the incoming sockets. The coolers did still perform very decently. But not at top-notch as better.

Well that is until our next review sample was released. Scythe route back to the top of the cooling throne begins with the newly released Yasya. The Yasya is the first in line to use Scythe’s new T.M.L.F or Trident Multi Layer Fin technology. This new technology simple put is placing the fins in an unparalleled arrangement to reduce the static pressure allowing for better heat transfer. Does it work? Read on and find out.

Scythe take on the Yasya

Yasya, high-end tower cooler is based on the newly developed  T.M.L.F. (Trident Multi Layer Fin) structure. This provides a higher intake volume, thus enabling a more efficient use of the six fanned out copper heatpipes. For ventilation, new 120 mm fan “Slip Stream 120 Adjustable PWM” is used.

Specifications

Model Name:
Yasya CPU Cooler

Model No.:
SCYS-1000

Manufacturer:
Scythe Co., Ltd. Japan

Compatibility:
Intel®:
Socket T / LGA775
Socket LGA1156
Socket LGA1366

AMD®:
Socket 754
Socket 939
Socket AM2
Socket AM2+
Socket AM3
Socket 940

Dimensions:
130 x 108,5 x 159 mm / 5.12 x 4.27 x 6.26 in

Fan Dimensions:
120 x 120 x 25 mm / 4.72 x 4.72 x 0.98 in

Fan Speed:
Max. Band 740 (±25%) – 1,900 rpm (±10%)
Min. Band 470 (±30%) – 1,340 rpm (±10%)

Noise Level:
Max. Band 9.8 – 37.0 dBA
Min. Band: 7.05 – 27.3 dBA

Air Flow:
Max. Band 37.15 – 110.31 CFM = 63 – 187 m³/h
Min. Band: 23.0 – 76.53 CFM = 39 – 130 m³/h

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Weight Included Fan:
848 g / 29.91 oz.

Material of Base Plate:
Nickel-plated copper (more information)

Features

Trident Multi Layer Fin Structure

By placing the number of triangle shaped main & supplemental heatsink fins to maximize the air intake volume, heat absorb rate from the built-in heatpipes is ideal for extreme over-clocking purposes as well as to cool the high-end multicore CPU!

Unparallel Six Heatpipe Construction

Total six heatpipes placed in unparallel position,increase in heat transfer speed is accomplished!

Slip Stream 120 mm PWM Adjustable

Equipped with Scythe original Slip Stream PWM 120mm PWM Adjustable fan, it allows a user to choose the fully automatic PWM feature fan speed control or alternatively adjust the PWM band range to fulfill demands from silent to high performance users!

Closer look

The Scythe Yasya is aimed that the overclocker and enthusiast that want better performance without having to fork out more money for a faster processor. This comes in the form of overclocking. The Yasya is a rather large cooler but nowhere near the size of some of our recent review samples like the Noctua D14 and the Cogage Arrow. The Yasya weighs in at 848 grams with the fan mounted. And measures 130 x 108.5 x 159 mm or 5.12 x 4.27 x 6.26 inches.

The Yasya consist of a single tower of fifty plus aluminum fins. And from the various camera angles you can see visually what the T.M.L.F. is made up of. The arrangement looks something like a pair wings but the arrangement serves its purpose. The V gap in the arrangement eliminates the fan’s hub from being a dead spot.

To support to tower of fin are six unparalleled copper heat-pipes. The placement of the heat pipes are such a way that heat is distributed into different locations of the fins. The heat pipes come in contact with the base in the standard fashion and does not result to the direct heat technology we have seen in some coolers. The pipes measure 6mm in diameter and are not coated in nickel which is common nowadays. To come the cooler looking superb the pipes are capped off at the top using a nut.

To top off the Yasya the base sure a common trait of Scythe which is a very shiny base. Looking at it closely you can see there are very little evidence of machining. In the case of the base it is nickel coated.

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Assembling and mounting

The Yasya is a fully compatible cooler that supports all the AMD sockets since the 754 and all the Intel sockets since the 775. And in order to prepare the cooler for mounting Scythe has accomplished to make it very simple. Honestly, dealing with Scythe coolers over the years we have determined their mounting process is the simplest.

There are just two set of brackets that comes with the Scythe so the bag of accessories is minimum. The bracket meant for Intel sockets is adjustable between the spacing needed for 775, 1156 and 1366. The bracket simply snaps into the lower aluminum heat sink of the cooler. Done. The Intel brackets are of the standard Intel OEM type so removing the motherboard from the cases is not necessary.

For active cooling the Yasya is mated with a new Slipstream 120mm fan with PWM built-in. And to aid in speed and noise a fan controller is integrated into the wiring. RPM range between 1340 to 1900 while noise level is between 27 and 37 dBA. Good for 76 to 110 CFM.

Here we have the Scythe Yasya mount to the motherboard. We are pleased to announce we had no issues with clearance on our board.

Testing

Testing Hardware:

Motherboard: ASUS P7P55D-E Deluxe
Processor: Intel Core i5 750 @ 3.8GHz at 1.3 volts
Ram: OCZ DDR3 1600 4GB Dual Channel
Video Card: Sapphire HD 5750
HDD: Hitachi 1TB
Power: Thermaltake Tough Power XT 850 (Sponsored by Thermaltake)
Case: NA
Cooling: Cogage Arrow
OS: Microsoft Windows 7 64-bit
Thermal compound: Arctic Silver 5

Competition:

Noctua D14
Thermaltake Frio

Testing of the Scythe Yasya

Over time, we’ve found that we have been able to get a better overclock on our i5 750 at a very respectable voltage of 1.3. We used this for the testing the Yasya. During testing, we allow the system to sit idle for one hour and then measured the temperature. Afterward, we then loaded OCCT and ran a 30 minute bench session with priority set at high and recorded the temps at the end. Each core was recorded for more detailed performance stats.

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Results

When at idle the Yasya did not really compare to the dual tower models we have tested lately. But this is obvious as the dual tower models like the Cogage Arrow and the D14 has a huge advantage mass-wise as well as cooling. The Yasya was a direct competitor with the Thermaltake Frio when using a single fan as the numbers were identical.

With a load on the rig we found the Frio using a single fan one up the Yasya. A single degree separated the two throughout the testing. But remember the Frio is 200 grams heavier and comes with a stronger fan. Not shown in the chart below we took one of the Thermaltake fans from the Frio and mated it with the Yasya. Results were slightly different as the numbers were once again identical to the Frio. But at the cost of more noise.

Conclusion

The Yasya lives up to the Scythe motto of being the better noise-to-performance cooler. And at the same time take the throne as the better performance-to-price cooler. Does the Yasya have a chance to become a top cooler? No. But if you are looking for a cooler that does perform and cost you less than $50 to purchase, you can’t beat it at all. Coolers that do outperform the Yasya will cost you upwards of $65 easily.

The looks of the Yasya to me is awesome to look at. Heavily resembling others on the market but the T.M.L.F. (Trident Multi Layer Fin) configuration does make it stand out.

Assembling the Yasya is a no-brainer. It is fast and simple. Many may down the cooler because it uses the OEM Intel push-pins but for a direct OEM replacement and the fact that the cooler is not too heavy we see this an non-issue but each his own. A more complex mounting system would place the Yasya reach out of the price range it currently seats. And that would result in Prolimatech Megahalems price range. And that would not be beneficial for Scythe at all.

If it was up to us we would have like to see anmother set of wire clips placed in the accessory bag for those that would want to place another fan on the cooler.

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ProClockers was founded in 2004, and since then we have reviewed thousands of tech products, including motherboards, CPUs, graphics cards, PC cases, cooling solutions and more. Whilst many of the original products we reviewed back then have long bit the dust, we continue working hard to provide unbiased PC hardware and tech reviews.

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